Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip

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What is Arthritis of the Hip?

Arthritis in general is a disease that impacts the joints, which are where two bones meet. Arthritis attacks the joints’ tissues, leading to pain that can be downright debilitating. Hip arthritis can make it difficult to perform many daily tasks, even actions as simple as walking. Inflammatory arthritis (such as rheumatoid arthritis) is caused by an overactive immune system, as opposed to age- or trauma-related wear.

Who Does Arthritis of the Hip Affect?

Anyone may find themselves suffering from hip arthritis. Of course, there are some groups that are more prone to this condition than others.

Arthritis of all types is most commonly found in older patients, and the same is true for hip arthritis. However, when we’re specifically talking about inflammatory arthritis, the condition can appear in patients of all ages. Symptoms of inflammatory hip arthritis often begin in early adulthood.

The most common forms of inflammatory hip arthritis include psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

What are the Symptoms of Hip Arthritis?

Hip arthritis symptoms are much the same as other types of arthritis. It’s common to experience aching pains in the affected area, along with a limited range of motion. You may find that your hip hurts more in the morning or after you’ve been sitting down for a while, but the pain decreases once you’ve been active for a bit. In severe cases, patients may find it difficult to walk or may walk with a limp.

Symptoms of inflammatory arthritis can also extend beyond the joint in question. Patients may experience more general symptoms such as fatigue, loss of appetite, and fever.

How is Arthritis of the Hip Treated?

Sadly, there is no cure for arthritis of the hip. Still, with proper diagnosis and treatment, those suffering from arthritis can manage their pain and get back to an active and fulfilling daily life.

You’ll first need a diagnosis before undergoing hip arthritis treatment. If you suspect that you have inflammatory arthritis, set up an appointment with a rheumatologist. They will begin by asking about your symptoms and your medical history before performing a physical examination, which reveals the hip’s range of motion.

You will be evaluated for a limp or any other issues with your gait. Your doctor may also order X-rays or blood tests to confirm a diagnosis.

Hip arthritis treatment doesn’t always require surgery. Many patients find that the use of NSAID pain relievers like ibuprofen can be effective in pain reduction. Your doctor may also recommend corticosteroids to control pain and suppress the immune system.

To help you walk easier, your doctor may recommend assistive equipment such as a walker or a cane. You may also find it helpful to get a “reacher” or “grabber,” allowing you to retrieve items from around the house and perform your daily tasks more easily.

In addition to other treatment methods, your doctor may also recommend a physical therapy regimen. Undergoing physical therapy will help you increase the range of motion in your hip, strengthen the hip and the surrounding muscles, and feel more confident in your everyday movements.

Hip Arthritis Surgical Options

Some patients don’t experience relief from nonsurgical treatment methods. In these cases, surgery may be necessary. Your doctor will speak with you at length about your options if surgery is considered the best path for your treatment.

There are several types of surgery you may undergo. Your doctor will determine the best course of treatment based on the condition of your hip, your age, and the progression of your arthritis in its particular form.

Perhaps the most common hip arthritis surgery is a total hip replacement. In this procedure, your surgeon will take out the damaged bone and cartilage in the hip and replace them with new joint surfaces made from plastic or metal. Total hip replacement is often recommended for those who suffer from ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis.

Another option is a synovectomy. This procedure involves removing some or all of the synovium, which is the joint lining. Synovectomy is often most effective in patients in the early stages of the disease and in those whose arthritis is concentrated in the joint lining (as opposed to the cartilage).

To learn more about Hip Arthritis treatment options in the Fort Myers, Estero and Naples area, contact Orthopedic Center of Florida.

Meet our Hip Doctors:

John A. Berra, DO

John A. Berra, DO

Fellowship Trained Orthopedic SurgeonOrthopedic Services and Sports Medicine SpecialtiesHip[button...

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Mark E. Farmer, MD

Mark E. Farmer, MD

Fellowship Trained Fort Myers Orthopedic SurgeonOrthopedic Services and Sports Medicine SpecialtiesShoulder[button...

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Ed Gomez, MD

Ed Gomez, MD

Board Certified Orthopaedic SurgeonOrthopedic Services and Sports Medicine SpecialtiesShoulder[button...

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David Heligman, MD

David Heligman, MD

Board Certified Orthopaedic SurgeonOrthopedic Services and Sports Medicine SpecialtiesShoulder[button...

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